Slow cooker spent grain beer bread

Spent grain beer breadThis recipe is based on the Herbed Crock Pot Bread Recipe by Tiffany and Alison Holsts “beer braid”. I found the original herb bread recipe too sweet and as a home brewer I’m always after more ways to use up spent grain. The recipe and method really isn’t that different, though I don’t have a dough hook so knead it by hand.

The flavour will obviously vary a lot depending on the beer and grains you use, but works well with dark beers and associated grains. As you’re using spent grain, this will be a lot softer than a traditional malted loaf.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup of beer (warm) – what ever you have to hand
  • 1 packet quick bread yeast
  • 1 cup of spent grain
  • 2½ cups strong bed flour

Method

Put the first 5 ingredients into a warm bowl, mix thoroughly, cover and ignore for about 10 minutes.

Line your slow cooker with parchment paper, try to get this smooth as the bread may expand until it presses into the paper. Depending on the size of loaf and the size and shape of your slow cooker.

Add the flour and spent grain, and stir until you have a firm dough. You made need more flour or beer depending on how wet your spent grain is. once you have a firm dough turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 10 minutes ( or until the dough springs back when pressed gently). If you have a dough hook, do whatever I don’t have one so don’t know but it’s probably much the same.

Shape the dough into a suitable shape for your slow cooker and put it in ( your slow cooker should be cold at this point). Put the lid on your slow cooker and turn it onto high, go and do something else for an hour. Check to see if it needs longer by testing with a skewer, I find with my crock pot it tends to need about 1½ hours. If it seems ready check that the bottom has browned. This produces a soft load with a pale crust, if you want a bit more of a crust put it into a hot oven for a few minutes.

About Giolla

Based on the edge of Hop country between London and Kent, I'm tending to brew seasonally from what grows in my own garden or can be foraged from the local meadows and country side.
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